Tapping into the Emerging Muslim Consumer Market. What should natural skincare and cosmetics businesses consider?

IMG_0566 (2)When it comes to looking fabulous consumers will spend hundreds of pounds on products that make them feel and look good.  With the rise of celebrity youtubers and instragrammers showcasing their use of luxury products, everyone wants branded products.  Not surprisingly, the ethnic community, in particular the Muslim community in the West, whose spending power for a very long time was considered negligible is now a rapidly growing customer base for skincare and cosmetics companies globally. 

Mainstream businesses have already started to cater for this growing niche.  All you need to do is look at the shift in models and the several shades of foundations and BB creams currently available on the market.  Whilst the consumer market is rapidly growing, so is the availability of brands.  The beauty industry is now a very lucrative, yet competitive market to be in, all promising a high-end product that are better for the consumer.   

As the demand for innovative beauty products is on the rise, the consumer is also becoming more aware of what they are purchasing.  Today the industry is consumer led.  Consumers are paying more attention to what they put on their skin, resulting in the rise of natural, organic and plant based products.  New companies such as Tropic Skincare, Bodhi & Birch, Pai Skincare, and Inika Organic are all wanting a piece of the beauty market, but breaking into a market led by the age old traditional brands is not that easy.  Brands such as MAC cosmetics, Yves Saint Laurent, Chanel and Clinique all have a loyal following. So how can the newly emergent organic and natural business increase its share in the market? It’s simple, think strategically and invest outside the box, certifications!  

I recently purchased a cosmetics box that really fits my ‘wish list’.  Having searched high and low for a brand that fit my pocket and requirements of being organic, plant based, cruelty free and alcohol free, I stumbled upon Inika Organic, an Australian based cosmetics company.  Not only have they invested in certifications to appease the mainstream market, they’ve seized an opportunity and achieved halal certification.  A certification that’s opening up doors to a new global consumer base.  

For the growing ethnic consumer market of which I am a part of, this was the perfect product to purchase.  I was a bit dubious when I placed the order, but I have to admit, I’m not disappointed. The products arrived in a recyclable box with minimal packaging, feel great on the skin and carry a multitude of certifications including vegan, cruelty free, organic and halal. 

Whilst a number of brands will carry various certifications, many have not considered investing in halal certification.  Businesses manufacturing products that are natural, plant based, free of alcohol and produced in environments free from contamination of animal or alcohol derived products should think about halal certification. The halal certification holds a lot of weight in the Muslim community.  So if you own a brand that meets the above criteria, why not look into the certification?  You might find that you will have attracted a consumer who would normally not consider your brand.

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